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Summer 2015 Programming Schedule

Summer 2015 Study Group
Government Relations & Lobbying: A Primer
with Dole Summer Fellow, Bob Steil
Wednesday, June 3 – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
General Overview of Lobbying
Guest: Tim Powers, Artemis Strategies, Washington DC
Tim Powers of Artemis Strategies in Washington, D.C., will discuss what is involved in lobbying as well as the difference between federal and state lobbying. Powers also will shed light on the public’s image of lobbyists, why one would become a lobbyist, and how to define success and what “works” for a lobbyist. Special attention will be given to conduct regulations and ethics.


2015 Ft. Leavenworth Series
Military Innovations: US Interwar Cavalry
with Alexander M. Bielakowski
Thursday, June 4th – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
Following World War I, horse cavalry entered a period during which it fought for its very existence against mechanized vehicles. On the Western Front, the stalemate of trench warfare became the defining image of the war throughout the world. While horse cavalry remained idle in France, the invention of the tank and its potential for success led many non-cavalry officers to accept the notion that the era of horse cavalry had passed. During the interwar period, a struggle raged within the U.S. Cavalry regarding its future role, equipment, and organization. Some cavalry officers argued that mechanized vehicles supplanted horses as the primary means of combat mobility within the cavalry, while others believed that the horse continued to occupy that role. The response of prominent cavalry officers to this struggled influenced the form and function of the U.S. Cavalry during World War II.

Alexander M. Bielakowski is a former U.S. Army Reserve officer who has published on such diverse topics as Polish Americans in the Civil War, African Americans in World War II, Dwight D. Eisenhower as the first commander of NATO, and Vietnam War movies. He has authored or co-authored three monographs as well as edited a two-volume reference work. Currently, he is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal U.S. Military History Review and an Associate Professor of Military History at CGSC.


Summer 2015 Study Group
Government Relations & Lobbying: A Primer
with Dole Summer Fellow, Bob Steil
Wednesday, June 10 – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
State Lobbying: A National Trade Association’s Multi-State Perspective
Guest: Mark Pratt, Senior VP for State Affairs, America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), Washington DC
Guest speaker Mark Pratt will define the functions of a national trade association and how it handles state lobbying. Discussion topics will include whether lobbying approaches are uniform across state lines, how lobbying efforts are received in states, and if trade associations secure the services of local lobbyists.


Summer 2015 Study Group
Government Relations & Lobbying: A Primer
with Dole Summer Fellow, Bob Steil
Wednesday, June 17 – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
Federal Lobbying
Guest: Kristen Freitas, Senior Director of Federal Affairs of HDMA in Washington DC
Kristen Freitas, senior director of federal affairs at HDMA in Washington, D.C., will outline the components of federal lobbying and the differences between working with Congress, the White House and federal agencies. Freitas will talk about whom lobbyists mainly interact with and how “gridlock” affects lobbying activities.


Summer 2015 Study Group
Government Relations & Lobbying: A Primer
with Dole Summer Fellow, Bob Steil
Wednesday, June 24 – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
Lobbying in Kansas
Guest: William W. Sneed, Polsinelli, Topeka, KS
William Sneed of Polsinelli in Topeka will talk about what is unique to lobbying in Kansas. He’ll also cover the importance of relationship building, how lobbyists familiarize themselves with issues, what roles relationships with outside interests play and more. Sneed also will discuss the need and ability to lobby on both sides of the aisle.


Summer 2015 Study Group
Government Relations & Lobbying: A Primer
with Dole Summer Fellow, Bob Steil
Wednesday, July 1 – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
Lobbying From a Kansas Legislator’s Perspective
State Sen. Susan Wagle will join the conversations to discuss perceptions of lobbyists and the “good” and “bad” approaches lobbyists take. Wagle and Steil will also look into what motivates legislators in terms of promoting legislation and pressures to vote with “the party” vs. individual initiaties.


2015 Ft. Leavenworth Series
Military Innovations: Battle of the Yalu – All-Steel Warship
with Dr. Terry Beckenbaugh
Thursday, July 2nd – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
Dr. Terry Beckenbaugh will discuss the significance of the first major battle between two all-steel fleets in the pre-dreadnaught era and its ramifications on naval warfare. The Battle of the Yalu River, fought on 17 September, 1894 is the decisive battle of the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95. It not only opened a significant era in naval warfare, it also marked the beginning of Japan’s rise as a colonial power in northeast Asia.

Dr. Terry Beckenbaugh is an Associate Professor of Military History within the Department of Military History at the US Army Command & General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth. He is currently working on a book focusing on the White River campaign in Arkansas in 1862, and eventual Confederate defeat in the American Civil War.


Historical Interpretation: Performance TBA
Wednesday, July 15 – 7 p.m. at the Dole Institute.
Each summer, the Dole Institute brings in a historical interpreter to portray an important figure in American History. These programs are popular with the community and appropriate for all ages. Bring your family and friends to the Dole Institute and go back in time to be inspired and fascinated by these individuals and their life stories.


2015 Ft. Leavenworth Series
Military Innovations: USMC Interwar Innovation
with Dr. John Curatola
Thursday, August 6th – 3:00 p.m. at the Dole Institute
During the interwar years the US Marine Corps established the doctrine of amphibious assault. The idea of storming a defended beach from shipborne platforms was a uniquely American innovation during this period. The story of how and why the Marine Corps developed this capability is an excellent example of peacetime military innovation.

Dr. John Curatola is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth KS. A retired Marine officer, Dr. Curatola served 22 years and participated in Operation Provide Hope, Somalia in 1992, Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003, and Tsunami Relief efforts in 2005. He has written numerous chapters and articles on World War II and is currently finishing a manuscript for a book examining post-World War II atomic bombing strategy.

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